Perfect Babies

Growing Family

My grandson was born about 7 months ago. He is perfect: all ten toes and fingers. A delightful personality. Curious about his world. Surrounded – enveloped – by a family that has embraced his uniqueness, loved him fiercely, insisted on the very best care available. Recently, our precious, perfect baby had his fourth surgery to correct a serious birth defect. Unfortunately, there were complications, and he endured yet another surgery, with the promise of more to come.

There are many lessons a new parent learns in this situation, valuable lessons that last a lifetime. I know. I too gave birth to such a perfect baby . . . Thirty-five years ago, we were fighting for his life. On the outside he looked fine, but inside his new little body things were terribly wrong. We, too, were blessed with excellent medical care and a loving family and community who pulled us through. For the most part, now, I watch my adult son with admiration for who he has become, grateful that he has embraced life with passion and compassion. I don’t dwell on the difficulties surrounding his early years . . . but the lessons I learned have been woven into my psyche, influencing much of who I am today.

First lesson: Life is a gift. The line between life and death is fine indeed, and we have very little control over it. Don’t take it for granted. Ever!

Second lesson: Children are a gift, not a possession. These precious babies don’t belong to us, but to God. They reside in our homes for a few brief years, and in our hearts for a lifetime, but they are not ours to control. It’s a heavy responsibility, raising one of God’s gifts – one of the most profound, exasperating, joyous, humbling jobs anyone can ever be given. But it is a temporary assignment – at least the “hands on” part. At some point, you have to turn them loose, trusting that the wings you gave them will carry them safely into adulthood. And also trusting that the roots you built for them will become a solid foundation as they build their own reality, apart from you.

Third lesson: Sweat the small stuff, even though you never lose sight of the big stuff. Children notice the little things. They remember the details that we adults often skim over: Days that begin with a simple hug. An impromptu trip to the zoo. Approving eye contact at the end of a school concert. A bowl of chicken noodle soup or baked custard to ease the discomfort of a cold. That favorite shirt, clean and ready for the next special event. A weekly pause for ice cream on the way home from school. A favorite toy or blanket, safely stowed in the car at the beginning of a trip. Love is in the details – all those little things parents know and do that communicate that child’s importance – that say, “I love you.” Kids know. . .

Fourth lesson: Forgiveness is real. Life is not perfect! But grace and mercy are! I remember telling my son that he did not come with an instruction manual! There were times when I honestly did not know what was the best thing to do, times when my best guess was most likely quite wrong, times when I simply blew it with my children. There were times when I had to apologize to my boys, acknowledging that the real reason I was upset actually had very little to do with them.

Understanding life’s imperfections, embracing the unpredictable nuances, helps me understand Who God is. God is bigger than our mistakes, greater than our short-sightedness, master of our childishness. Redemption, to me, means bringing good from bad, making lemonade out of life’s lemons, moving on with the confidence that children are resilient, and God’s love is constant.

There is really no such thing as “perfection” as Webster defines it. The illusion that God rewards good behavior with a “perfect” life is just that – an illusion. Rather, God’s love flows around and through us, forgiving us when we are less than we were created to be, working creatively to show us how to live. God’s mindful Presence helps me fill in the gaps, knowing that I am loved in spite of, not because of.  Perfection, for me, is all about embracing the day, walking in God’s Presence, confident that whatever happens, Someone far greater than I am is ultimately in control.

 And so, we as a family embrace this new little one with joy and pride and anticipation. His body, we trust, will be put in proper working order, and we will move on from here, ever so grateful for the skilled medical professionals who served as modern day miracle workers. I watch my son and daughter-in-law with gratitude for their attention to the details, for their determination to take care of this precious gift, and for sharing him with all of us. I trust that they, too will discover that God is good. All the time. Even in the midst of the roller coaster craziness that is part and parcel of current events.

 

 

About vivace1017

I grew up in the hills of East Tennessee, in a well-educated, articulate, highly creative community. Venturing forth from my hometown at age 17, I attended a small college near Knoxville, and began my career as a music teacher in Taichung, Taiwan. I wound my way from there through grad school in Louisville, KY to a brief sojourn in Georgia, and landed finally, with a husband and two sons in south central Virginia. My career journey has meandered from private music studio to public school classroom, from church organ bench to grant writing and photography. Now, roles are changing again, settling into places that have always been a part of me, yet are only now realizing my best attention. This site is my internal voice as I work through who I have been, who I want to be, and the legacy I want to leave in my wake.
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3 Responses to Perfect Babies

  1. Merle says:

    Related to your second and fourth lessons……. I learned the hard way! Sometimes, we have to forgive ourselves, as well as forgiving them and they forgiving us. We must not beat ourselves up and blame ourselves (what did I do wrong, what could I have done better, why didn’t I see….?) when children/grandchildren stumble away from the path through what we consider to be “wrong” choices. As a very wise friend said to me in the midst of my despair, “You are no more responsible for their mistakes than you are for their every achievement. Ultimately, they are responsible for their own actions and choices. We just pray we have equipped them sufficiently to handle those responsibilities in a wise manner.” Sometimes all we can do is continue to tell them how much they are loved and PRAY!

  2. Jim Rodgers says:

    Love you, Sis! Praying for that precious little gift, his parents, and Grandparents! May the Lord richly bless you as He takes you through yet another rough patch of life, by which He ever works to lovingly smooth and shape our lives to bring out His image in us. As the Silversmith working over His refining pot longs to see his image in the refined silver, He has a plan by which He works. He is always lovingly working and never places us in any situation that He is adequate to handle as we look and trust on Him. Love you…praying!!!

  3. Janet fuller says:

    May God continue to touch this precious one with his healing . That no complications will develope . Blessings Janet

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